A Walk In The Spring Rain

With winter’s departure at my doorstep, I alight upon the memory of a day in a rainfall that caressed me with the soothing warmth of your touch.

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Falling upon the blankets of water that condensed from the gray skies, I clung to you, slipping amid the warmth of your skin.

Time awaits no one, and in a moment that carried me away in the bliss of a cool breeze, you walked by my side.

Ripples in the ponds of life stemmed forth in our every step together, your smile, a reflection amid the mirrors that coalesced at every turn.

Observing our progress along the white of clouds that brushed our feet, gently ascending, leading us to where the stars lay hidden, and our spirits flew free.

In a story that is to be told, your eyes reflected the words of my heart, our laughter resonating amid the silent melodies of the world.

A beautiful blossom, you remained, weathering the winds of time that passed our wake, embracing me into the petals of your life.

Into a stillness that resounded in the minute strikes of my heart, my eyes met yours, the cold moisture of the crystals giving way to the warmth of your lips.4b9b99b1_o

Serenaded by the orchestral pitter-patter of the rainfall surrounding our feet, I indulged in the moment, falling and rising about your heartbeat.

Carried by the whims of nature, our shadows basking in the gentle ray of sunshine that awakens the distant horizon, in an adventure to continue, with the coming of spring.

Why Is Snow So Bright?!

If one wishes to experience the full spectrum of the annual cycle of the four seasons, Edmonton is certainly the place to visit. Though it varies every year, you can expect an early start to spring around March, with summer setting the pace in June, autumn settling in with September, followed closely by winter arriving around October at the earliest. Winter, in fact, is the chief minstrel of Edmonton’s seasonal ballad (Figure 1), with Boreas providing for the brittle winds, and dense snowfall that sweep across the city during this season.

Figure 1. Edmonton’s winter skyline

Who doesn’t like snow? I myself have never denied an opportunity to jump into or wade my way through a dense pools of snow (just make sure you are wearing the appropriate gear for the occasion), or on some occasions push others into them (my partner, Leina, in particular, could relate to a few “sweet” memories). In fact, it was only after arriving in Edmonton, 19 years old to boot, that I first saw snow in my life. This was back in 2009, and now that 2016 has come to an end, I have rounded off seven years to my predominantly snow-filled life in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Despite all of this, if there is one thing that I could never get used to in all these years, it would have to be waking up in the early hours of the day to the bright, and mildly annoying  pure, ambient white light emanating from the snow outside my apartment, leading now to the subject of our post, “Why Is Snow So Bright?”

The answer is quite simple. Snow has the highest albedo of any naturally occurring substance on Earth. Albedo is the percentage of reflectance (of light) off the surface of an object. Snow is ~ 90% reflective, which is why it is so damn bright. This begs the question of how a reflective surface may appear brighter than its diffuse illuminant (the sky, in this case). Having done a little bit of back-reading, it is reported,

“Three factors are largely responsible for this visually striking effect: the law of darkening for the cloud cover, the reflectivity of the snow and the average landscape albedo, and the observer’s contrast sensitivity function.”

 J.J. Koenderink, and W.A. Richards, Why is snow so bright?, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, Vol. 9, No. 5, May 1992. 

We find that the explanation for the brightness of snow is a mixed physical, and psychophysical phenomenon. While the paper provided by J.J. Koenderink, and W.A. Richards go into great detail on the scientific methods that support these observations, I will provide a summary covering some of the interesting facts found in the paper. The three factors, aforementioned, are examined in a sequential manner, and the necessary conclusions derived accordingly.

The Scattering of Light

We begin with the law of darkening for the cloud cover. This involves intuitive observations we often make about the radiance or illuminance of the sky. The sky is not uniformly illuminated. This is quite noticeable depending on the elevation of our line of sight with respect to the horizon. Two factors are largely responsibly for the darkening that is usually observed from the maximum brightness we find at the zenith (point in the sky directly above us) to the grayish haze that we identify as the horizon:

“The angular distribution of the forward scattering (average differential scattering cross section) and the backreflectance to the clouds off the surface of the Earth.”

Light, or electromagnetic radiation, from the sun is scattered by particles in the atmosphere. This is commonly known as Rayleigh Scattering named after the British physicist Lord Rayleigh (Figure 2), a principle that describes the scattering of light by particles much smaller than the wavelength of the radiation.

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Figure 2. Lord Rayleigh

These particles can be individual atoms or molecules. The light from the sun is a mixture of all colors of the rainbow. Using a prism one can separate the “white” light from the sun to its different colors forming a spectrum (Figure 3). These colors are distinguished by their different wavelengths. Our vision is limited to what is known as the visible part of the spectrum ranging between red light at wavelengths of 720 nm to violet with a wavelength of 380 nm.

Figure 3. The visible spectrum (ROYGBIV)

In between, we have orange, yellow, green, blue, and indigo. The retina of the human eye has three different types of color receptors that are most sensitive to red, green, and blue wavelengths providing us the colored vision of our environment. On a clear cloudless day, we observe that the sky is blue. This is because molecules in the air scatter blue light from the sun more than they scatter red light. Meanwhile, at sunset we see the familiar red, and orange haze because the blue light from earlier has been scattered out, and away from our line of sight (Figure 4).

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Figure 4. Why is the sky blue?

Similarly, forward scattering is a subset of radiation scattering which involves changes in direction of less than 90 degrees. In contrast, the effect of the backreflectance of the surface of the Earth is found to be largely independent of the visual angle of observation as the clouds of an overcast sky are roughly Lambertian. No matter from what angle the observer views a Lambertian surface, the brightness of the surface apparently is the same. Unfinished wood is known to roughly exhibit Lambertian reflectance, while a glossy/coated wooden surface does not. These two factors, forward scattering and backreflectance, contribute to the radiance of the sky, and the observed darkening of the sky from the bright zenith to the grayish horizon.

What about our eyes?

From here onwards, it is smooth sailing. The paper discusses the last two major factors including the reflectivity of snow and the average landscape albedo, and the observer’s contrast sensitivity function. It is found that the albedo of snow typically ranges from 80% to 95% across the spectrum with lower values for higher snow densities. Though snow is not a true Lambertian surface, the approximation is satisfactory. The landscape albedo figures into much of the calculations involved, and we find that it is only in extreme situations that the radiance of the snow is equal to the radiance of the horizon sky. In general, a whiteout (Figure 5),  is only possible if the reflectance of the landscape is above 50% which rules out most effective natural landscapes with the exception of snow itself.

Figure 5. Whiteout, a weather condition where visibility and contrast is severely reduced by snow (or sand). As can be observed, the horizon disappears completely.

Much of what is demonstrated in the paper shows that the contrast effect of snow can cause the sky at the horizon to appear darker than the zenith sky. But, the zenith sky is still found to be brighter than the snow, so why is it that we are not able to recognize this difference, and identify that the sky is indeed brighter than the snow? The answer is once again quite simple. The sky at the horizon is darker than at the zenith owing to the law of darkening described earlier. This results in a gradient over the circular dome above us, but one that is so shallow that the gradient is generally not noticeable to the comparative resolution of our eyes, thus leading us to believe that the snow is in fact brighter than the sky that illuminates it.

References

  •  J.J. Koenderink, and W.A. Richards, Why is snow so bright?, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, Vol. 9, No. 5, May 1992.

 

Contemplating at Home…

Hi everyone, so here we are, already a month into 2017!

I’m now one week into my two-month vacation in Bangalore, India. Arriving on the wee hours of January 17th, my break got off to a rough start as I was sick for a week, not to mention the jet lag, and the time difference. Thankfully, I made a full recovery last weekend, and have been enjoying my time with my family.

Bangalore ain’t necessarily my hometown, which is actually further south at Madurai. 

Prior to my departure, I had worked my ass off content editing Agent X, a two-week challenge that left me fatigued, and deserving a brief hiatus from the computer screen. While falling sick didn’t necessarily make for a great experience, I can confidently say it did the job of keeping me away from my laptop for long enough that I’m now refreshed, and ready to continue.

Apart from the rudimentary rituals of daily life at home, I also had the chance to embark on a wild-life safari with my family where I visited my fellow animal friends in tigers, lions, zebras, bears, and many others from the crocodylidae, and aves families at the Bannerghata National Park.

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What are you looking at? 
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Too tired to give a damn.

But, amidst all the entertainment, I discovered occasional pockets of silence that helped me contemplate on the roller-coaster of a ride 2016 has been, both personally, and on the grander scale of events that have “rocked” the world.

While completing my second book has followed on the success of my Masters degree, I still found room for improvement in my life, and my ambitions for the future; a future that seems to be rapidly changing in concert with the events that have occurred in 2016. Though many such events did not affect me directly, I felt compelled to wage a healthy debate on said occurrences, and their direct implication for the future of the current generation of youngsters.

I’m referring to the recent establishment of a new leadership, the breaking of an alliance, the carnage of war, the mass exoduses, and the various other events that have displaced the state of the world extensively over the short duration of a single year. Buried among the various differences that set these events apart, there remains one lasting impression: the monotonous manner with which the various bureaucracies of the world, have monitored, and administered the lives of its citizens, and those of others; governments that have embezzled peoples’ beliefs, leading them along a misled, and deceptive path of life colored with extravagant rhetoric, but vacant promises.

Now in an age where we find limited invitations toward discussion, and recourse, there certainly are many youngsters, just like me, pondering their individual circumstances amid a changing world. A world filled with barriers, the least of which involves a great divide in communication. We either get bogged down in communication to the point where we are incapable of action, or vice-versa. But this inability of ours is also a daunting characteristic of human nature, and one which we must learn to overcome or make amends with if we are hoping

All of which brings me back to this pensive reverie, where I’d like to believe that by writing brief posts about the state of the world, my personal interests, and adventures that I may be contributing, at least a small bit, to a common desire of a generation that wishes its voice to be heard amid the swift tempest of the world. Now, I know this piece may have sounded quite out of sorts among the previous posts that I have uploaded on the blog, but it is a first step towards the greater plans I have in 2017 to branch out in the discussions I wish to provide in the blog. More specifically, it was just a play of words on the thoughts that came across my mind during my daily ruminations. Next up on the list, and certainly a tad different from the subject above, “Why is snow so bright?”